Meet the Board: Dr. Margie Ferree Jones, CWE

Dr. Margie Ferree Jones

Dr. Margie Ferree Jones

A few weeks ago, at our annual conference in Portland, the Society of Wine Educators (SWE) welcomed its new Executive Committee and Board of Directors.  Today we’d like to introduce you to one of our board members who was recently elected, Dr. Margie Ferree Jones. Dr. Jones has served on the board before, and we would like to welcome here back, and thank her for her service to the Society!

Dr. Margie Ferree Jones is a Professor at The Collins College of Hospitality Management at Cal Poly Pomona.  She joined the faculty at Cal Poly Pomona in 1990. In 2014, Dr. Jones received the Cal Poly Pomona Alumni Outstanding Teaching Award –the first recipient of this new award.

Margie has a Ph.D. from Claremont Graduate University and a master’s degree in hotel administration from Cornell University.   In addition to being an instructor for beverage-related coursework at the Collins College, Margie regularly teaches the capstone leadership course for seniors and has taught courses in marketing, special events, and food & beverage during her tenure at Cal Poly Pomona.  Margie was the curriculum chair for the college from 2001 to 2012.

In addition to being highly educated, Margie is certifiable (in wine)!  She is a Certified Wine Educator (CWE), a Certified Sommelier (CS), and  a Certified Bordeaux Educator with L’Ecole du Vin de Bordeaux.  She has also completed the WSET Level 3 Advanced Certificate in Wines and Spirits as well as the Napa Valley Wine Educators Academy.  She is currently working on completing her Sake Adviser Certificate.

Margie previously served as a Board Member for the Society of Wine Educators from 2009 to 2015, and we are happy to have her back! Welcome (back) to the board, Dr. Jones!

Conference Highlights 2017: All about Lodi

We had a wonderful time at the 41st Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators, held August 10-12, 2016 at the lovely Red Lion Hotel on the River, located on the Columbia River in Portland, Oregon. Below you will find some pictures, presentations, and handouts provided by our wonderful speakers – the next best thing to being there!

Stuart Spencer

Stuart Spencer

100 Varieties of Lodi and Growing—presented by Stuart Spencer: This session began with an overview of Lodi grape growers, which today include over 85 wineries and 750 growers farming over 100 varieties of vinifera grapes on more than 110,000 acres of vineyards. The reasons that Lodi is able to grow so many difference grape varieties successfully include its Mediterranean Climate, its diverse soils, support for polyculture (diversity of agriculture),  and the innovative spirit of the growers.  The session next turned to a study and tasting of some of the more unique grapes of Lodi, including Vermentino, Picpoul Blanc, Kerner, Albariño, Cinsaut, Graciano, and Toreldego (among others). For more information, see Stuart’s presentation here: 100 Varieties of Lodi and Counting-presented by Stuart Spencer and the Lodi Winegrape Commission

Lodi Native—presented by Stuart Spencer: The Lodi Native project is a collaborative project of six winegrowers of like mind, living and working in the Lodi AVA—particularly Lodi’s historic Mokelumne River sub-AVA.  Their mission is to turn the spotlight on the region’s heritage plantings—many of them dating back to the late 1800s—through sensible viticulture and minimalist winemaking practices. The focus is on Zinfandel, but on the taste of vineyards rather than varietal character or brand.

The detailed list of winemaking protocols is intended to keep the focus on sensible viticulture and minimalist winemaking practices, and include the following: native yeast fermentation, no acidification or de-acidification, no use of oak amendments (such as dust, chips, or staves), no new oak, no use of Mega-purple, and no tannin additions (among many others). For more information, see Stuart’s presentation here: Lodi Native-presented by Stuart Spencer and the Lodi Winegrape Commission

We will be posting many more conference recaps in the days to come, and will create a permanent record of them here.

Conference Highlights 2017: Rosé, Sparklers, and the Nectar of the Gods!

We had a wonderful time at the 41st Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators, held August 10-12, 2016 at the lovely Red Lion Hotel on the River, located on the Columbia River in Portland, Oregon. Below you will find some pictures, presentations, and handouts provided by our wonderful speakers – the next best thing to being there!

Rosé, Brosé, Frosé class

Rosé, Brosé, Frosé class

Rosé, Brosé, Frosé!!! New to rosé? Get Familiar with some of the Basics—presented by Sharron McCarthy, CSW: On Saturday morning, Sharron McCarthy, CSW presented a session highlighting high-quality rosé wines from around the world. The session started with the facts and stats that prove that rosé is clearly positioned as a segment leader and a growing market. For instance, as concerns rosé, according to Nielsen, rosé outpaces the overall wine category for the summer of 2017, and the trend is predicted to extend well beyond the summer.

As for brosé, according to columnist Richard Whitman, “Despite rumors to the contrary, manly men drink rosé!” And who can resist frozen rosé—frosé—the hottest new drink of the season!

The discussion moved to the many ways rosé is produced, including maceration, vin gris, saignée, and blending; as well as a discussion of some of the many leading rosé-producing regions of the world. The tasting included a variety of rosé wines produced using a range of grape varieties and production methods, and included rosés from all over the world. For a list of the wines and more information, see Sharron’s presentation: Rose, Brose, Frose – presented by Sharron McCarthy, CSW

The line-up of New Wave California Boutique Sparkling Wines

The line-up of New Wave California Boutique Sparkling Wines

The New Wave of Boutique California Sparkling Wines—presented by David Glancy, MS: Friday afternoon, David Glancy, MS gave a fascinating session on the “new wave” of boutique sparkling wines being produced in California. The session started with a history of sparkling wine in California, which began (amazingly enough) with Agostin Haraszthy, who built California’s first ʺChampagne Cavesʺ in Sonoma County 1862, and Paul Masson, who was known as the “Champagne King of California” beginning in 1905.

The discussion then turned to the wave of French investment in California sparkling wines with such examples of Moët & Chandon (Chandon based in California), G.H. Mumm & Co (Mumm Napa), Louis Roederer (Roederer Estate), and Taittinger (Domaine Carneros). Historic California “born and bred” sparkling wine producers—still producing outstanding wines—include Schramsberg, Iron Horse, and Scharffenberger.

The tasting portion of the class included some unique wines—a sparkling Tempranillo from  Capay Valley Vineyards (located in Yolo County’s Capay Valley AVA) and Flying Goat Crémant 2014 Brut (known as “Goat Bubbles) from Santa Maria Valley in San Luis Obispo County. Other outstanding wines included   Riverbench Blanc de Blancs Brut (Santa Maria Valley) 2014 produced using 100% Chardonnay, and Sea Smoke Blanc de Noirs Brut (Sta. Rita Hills) 2013 produced using 100% Pinot Noir. For more details on the session and the wines, see David’s presentation: The New Wave of California Boutique Sparkling Wines – presented by David Glancy

Ed Korry, CHE, CWE, CSS

Ed Korry, CHE, CWE, CSS

Dessert Wines: Nectar of the Gods—presented by Ed Korry, CHE, CWE, CSS:  On Saturday afternoon, Ed Korry, CHE, CWE, CSS presented a fascinating session on dessert wines. Starting with a discussion of the various production styles that produce dessert wines—including late harvest, dosage, arresting fermentation, ice wine, botrytis, and others—the session then moved on to a tasting and discussion of nine dessert wines. The first wine, Czar de José Duarte DOP Pico Vinho Licoroso 2009 Superior Meio Doce, was introduced by a discussion on the Pico DOP and the definition of vihho licoroso (as produced in the Pico DOP).

The next wine, Domaine Monemvassia PDO Malvasia Monemvassia-Malvasia 2010 (Greece) was preceded by a discussion on the history and progreny of the Malvasia grape variety. With just over 9,000 total bottles of the wine produced, this was a special tasting indeed.

The session continued on with the tasting of several Malvasia-based wines, including examples from Lipari (Italy) and Sitges (Spain). Other tastings and areas of discussion included Madeira and the sweet wines of the Roussillon. For more information, see Ed’s presentation: Nectar of the Gods-presented by Ed Korry

We will be posting many more conference recaps in the days to come, and will create a permanent record of them here.

Conference Highlights 2017: Sicily, Alsace, and the Côte d’Or

We had a wonderful time at the 41st Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators, held August 10-12, 2016 at the lovely Red Lion Hotel on the River, located on the Columbia River in Portland, Oregon. Below you will find some pictures, presentations, and handouts provided by our wonderful speakers – the next best thing to being there!

Paul Poux, CSW

Paul Poux, CSW

Sicily: Past, Present, and Future—presented by Paul Poux, CSW: Paul’s Saturday morning session began with the history of Sicily, from the Romans through the Byzantines and the Bourbons and all the way up to the Kingdom of Italy. Wine production, of course, was a part of all of this history, and this has resulted in Sicily as a leader in Italian wine production—the fourth-largest producer of wine in all of Italy’s twenty regions.

After this introduction, the wine tasting portion of the session began, starting with a selection of delightful white wines made from mostly local white grapes, including Catarratto, Grillo, Zibibbo, and Carricante. Geographical indications included the Sicily (Sicilia) DOC and Contea di Sclafani DOC as well as several IGTs.  The next wines, mostly reds, included those made from the following interesting grapes: Frappato, Nero d’Avola, Nerello Mascalese, Nerello Cappuccio, and Perricone. The red tasting included wines from the Sicily (Sicilia), Noto, and Etna Rosso DOCs.

For more details on the presentation and the wines, see Paul’s presentation here: Sicily-Past Present and Future-presented by Paul Poux

Michael Schafer, CSW

Michael Schafer, CSW

Amazing Alsace—presented by Michael Schafer, CSW: Bright and early Friday morning, Michael Schafer, CSW presented a session on the Amazing wines of Alsace. The session began with the story of the history of the Alsace area, from the “golden age” of 1600s, through the tumultuous times surrounding the World Wars, to liberation and the present day. The story of the wines of Alsace—the vineyards, the wine route, the terroir, and the AOCs—followed. Next, the specific styles of wine produced in Alsace—from Alsace AOC, Crémant d’Alsace, Vendage Tardive,  and Sélection de Grains Nobles (SGN) to Alsace Grand Cru. For more information, as well as a listing of the spectacular wines, see Michael’s presentation: Amazing Alsace-presented by Michael Schafer, CSW

Don Kinnan, CSS, CWE

Don Kinnan, CSS, CWE

Exploring the Backroads of the Côte d’Or (part 2)—presented by Don Kinnan, CSS, CWE: Back by popular demand, Don Kinnan, CSS, CWE brought us another installment of his journey along the “backroads” of the wine and regions of the Côte d’Or. Don led the class on a tour that began in the village of Monthélie, located somewhat between Meursault and Volnay. The next stops included Auxey-Duresses (often described as a “junior Meursault”), Saint-Aubin (bordering both Puligny- and Chassagne-Montrachet), and Santenay (one of the Côte d’Or’s southernmost wine villages).

For more details, including information on the wines and producers featured in this session, see Don’s presentation: The Backroads of la Cote d’Or – presented by Don Kinnan

We will be posting many more conference recaps in the days to come, and will create a permanent record of them here.

 

Conference Highlights 2017: Teaching and Tasting

We had a wonderful time at the 41st Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators, held August 10-12, 2016 at the lovely Red Lion Hotel on the River, located on the Columbia River in Portland, Oregon. Below you will find some pictures, presentations, and handouts provided by our wonderful speakers – the next best thing to being there!

Tim Gaiser, MS

Tim Gaiser, MS

Insight: Best Practices for Teaching Professional Tasting—presented by Tim Gaiser, MS:  On Friday morning, Tim Gaiser, MS shared the results of his recent survey on the best practices for teaching and coaching students in professional-level wine tasting. The session began with a discussion of best practices in teaching a tasting grid. Some of the advice (paraphrased) was as follows: use repetition until the “grid” becomes second nature, use “PRAT” (pace, rhythm, and timing), and to record one’s self going through the exercise.

The session moved on to a conversation about improving memory of specific aromas, tastes, flavors,  structural elements, and faults. Best practices for teaching these elements included the following (paraphrased as): start with extreme examples and work towards the middle, use an internal visual scale, and experience the basic fruits (cherry, apple, plum) at various stages (fresh, cut, dried, bruised, stewed).

For more details, including the actual quotations and their attributions, see Tim’s presentation: Insight-Best Practices for Teaching Professional Tasting-presented by Tim Gaiser, MS

Mike Cohen, CWE

Mike Cohen, CWE

The Chemistry of Wine Tasting—presented by Mike Cohen, CWE: On Saturday morning, Mike Cohen, CWE presented a detailed class about the chemistry and physiology of wine tasting. To start things off, there was a discussion of the chemical properties of wine, such as acids, sugars, alcohols, and polyphenols.

Next, the physiology of sensory perception in sight, smell, and taste was discussed. Finally, the session covered the brain’s role in sensory perception and the various factors—including the physical, chemical, biological, and psychological—that influence the sensory perception of wine. For more information, see Mike’s presentation: The Chemistry of Wine Tasting-presented by Mike Cohen, CWE

We will be posting many more conference recaps in the days to come, and will create a permanent record of them here.

 

Conference Highlights 2017: Riesling, Prosecco, and Oregon Chardonnay

We had a wonderful time at the 41st Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators, held August 10-12, 2016 at the lovely Red Lion Hotel on the River, located on the Columbia River in Portland, Oregon!

Below you will find some pictures, presentations, and handouts provided by our wonderful speakers—the next best thing to being there!

Roger Bohmrich, MX

Roger Bohmrich, MW

The Crystalline Beauty of Riesling: A Comparison of Global Styles—presented by Roger Bohmrich, MW: On Saturday afternoon, Roger Bohmrich, MW presented a comprehensive class of Riesling. The session began with a discussion of the characteristics of the Riesling vine and its suitability to various climates. Next, the class focused on the wines themselves: highly aromatic, highly acidic, sometimes dry and sometimes with a bit of RS, but almost never blended with other grapes.

As an introduction to the tasting portion of the class, Roger presented a taxonomy of Riesling styles—ranging from cool climate”just ripe” wines through intermediate and warm climates all the way up through ice wines and wines produced with botrytis-affected grapes. The tasting portion of the session began with New World Riesling, and included wines from Australia (Eden Valley and Clare Valley), Oregon (Willamette Valley), Washington State (Columbia Valley), Canada (Ontario’s Niagara Peninsula) and New York State (Finger Lakes).

The next portion of the tasting featured the benchmark Rieslings from the Old World. This tasting included wines from Germany (the Mosel, Rheingau, and Rheinhessen regions), Austria (the Wachau and Kamptal areas), and France (Alsace). For details of the wines and the slides of Rogerâ’s session, click here: The Crystalline Beauty of Riesling-Bohmrich-SWE 2017

Alan Tardi

Alan Tardi

Way Beyond Bubbles: Terroir, Tradition and Technique in Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco DOCG—presented by Alan Tardi: On Saturday morning, Alan Tardi told the story of the modern history of Prosecco, from 1876 when enologist Giovanni Battista Cerletti founded the Scuola Enologico in Conegliano, through the 1948 creation of the Bellini cocktail (Prosecco and fresh peach nectar) at Harry’s Bar in Venice, and all the way to the creation of the Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco DOCG in 2009.

The session continued with in-depth discussion of the climate, soils, and topography of some of the more specific Prosecco-producing areas such as Conegliano, the Rive di Farra di Soligo (in Valdobbiadene), and the Cartizze Sub-zone. The tasting included many interesting styles of Prosecco, including tranquile (non-sparkling), those using a percentage of indigenous grape varieties, several single-vineyard wines, and wines that underwent the second fermentation in the bottle (including one bottled “col fondo” [without disgorgement]). For more details, see the presentation here: Prosecco-Way Beyond Bubbles-Presented by Alan Tardi

Sam Scmitt, CS, CSS, CWE

Sam Scmitt, CS, CSS, CWE

Taking Root: The Renaissance of Chardonnay in Oregon’s Willamette Valley—presented by Sam Schmitt, CS, CSS, CWE: On Friday morning, Sam Schmitt, CS, CSS, CWE, told the story of Chardonnay in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. The class began with a discussion of the geologic history of Oregon and the formation of the soils—marine sediment, volcanic basalt, Missoula alluvial, and windblown loess—for which the area is now known.

The class then focused on the history of Chardonnay in Oregon, and revealed on surprising note: that the narrative that early Willamette Chardonnay was a failure is a great over generalization and exaggeration. Rather, the truth is that Chardonnay in Oregon experienced a long learning curve to determine what viticultural and winemaking procedures worked best for the grape in Oregon—similar to the process for “perfecting” the “Oregon style” of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris. The truth is, many early examples of Oregon Chardonnay were excellent.

The wines improved overall over the decades as many different clones and selections of the Chardonnay grape were planted. Some of these hailed from France, others from UC Davis, and many were promulgated by the founders of the Oregon wine industry, from David Lett to Bethel Heights. For more details on the session, as well as the wines included in the tasting, see the presentation here: Taking Root – Chardonnay in the Willamette Valley-presented by Sam Schmitt

We will be posting many more conference recaps in the days to come, and will create a permanent record of them here.

 

 

 

Meet the Board: Connor Best, CSW

Connor Best, CSW

Connor Best, CSW

A few weeks ago, at our annual conference in Portland, the Society of Wine Educators (SWE) welcomed its new Executive Committee and Board of Directors.  While many of our board members have served for quite a few years, there are also some new faces in the group as well.  Today we’d like to introduce you to one of our new board members, Connor Best, CSW…and thank him for his service to the Society!

Connor Best, CSW, is a new addition to the SWE Board of Directors. A native of South Louisiana, Connor made the leap from Cajun Country to Napa Valley to work a harvest after completing graduate school.  Now, 120 months later, Connor is fully immersed in the Napa Valley wine industry, working for the Napa Valley Vintners as Education Manager. Before joining the NVV, he worked in production and sales and two prominent Napa Valley wineries and as member relations manager for the NVV.

As the Education Manager, Connor is responsible for implementing the appellation education efforts of Napa Valley Vintners. Connor has been a SWE member for the past three years and has been an active participant in several of SWE’s past conferences. In addition to developing sessions for the SWE conference, Connor works to educate members of the trade on why Napa Valley is one of the world’s premiere wine regions through programs both in and outside of Napa Valley.

Connor has a Master’s Degree in Political Communications as well as a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and Government, both from Louisiana State University.

Welcome, Connor!

 

And the Banfi Award goes to…Lucia Volk, CWE!

Lucia Volk, CWE

Lucia Volk, CWE

Each year at the Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators, the Banfi Award is given to a CWE Candidate with the highest scores among all of the year’s candidates. The winner of the Banfi Award must also have  succeeded in passing all seated sections of the CWE Exam on the first attempt—a feat accomplished by a mere 12% of all CWE Candidates.

At this year’s SWE Conference in Portland, Oregon, it was our pleasure to award the 2017 Banfi Award to Lucia Volk, CWE. Neill Trimble, SWE’s First Vice President and Vice President of Advertising and Marketing for Banfi Vineyards, presented Lucia with the award—which includes a $2,500 honorarium—during Saturday’s luncheon.

Lucia Volk is a wine educator who lives in San Francisco. She runs a small wine education business, MindfulVine, offering small, tailored wine tastings in people’s homes.  Specializing in Old World wines, she especially loves to teach about the joys of drinking Riesling.  A native of Germany, Lucia likes to promote lesser known German wine regions. Lucia is also a trained anthropologist and teaches at San Francisco State University.

After the luncheon was over I asked Lucia a few questions about her journey to preparing for the CWE Exam. I am sure what she had to say will prove useful to future CWEs, future CSWs, and all serious students of wine!

 As you prepared for the CWE exam, what were some of your most effective study techniques?

There are dozens of study techniques—and everyone needs to find what works for them. With that being said, I am a big believer in absorbing small chunks of information at regular intervals.  That means 15 to 30 minutes of study a day, whether it is reading through the CSW Study Guide or Workbook, the CWE Manual, or digesting the Wine Bible or any of the other books on the Study List.

I am also a big believer in simulating exam situations: I took and retook all the multiple choice questions in the Workbook, as well as the Book Club chapter quizzes.  I labeled and relabeled the maps in the workbook, until I had memorized where the AVAs were. I used practice essay questions from the CWE manual to write out essays at home, timing myself doing it. Then I would look up information I missed or that I felt uncertain about, and rewrite the essay one more time. I also made up more essay questions.

The Award Ceremony

The Award Ceremony

As for the tasting portions of the CWE, I prepared by tasting a LOT.  I tasted by country, first looking at the label and writing down the flavor profile following the logical tasting rationale laid out by SWE. A day later, I would revisit the same bottles again, this time pouring them out of brown paper bags. I did a lot of repetition using the same wines, until I was certain I knew what I was tasting.  Investing in a Coravin helps at this stage, if you don’t already own one!

What part of the CWE did you find the most challenging?  

The faults and imbalances identification was the most challenging for me, simply because I had not tasted faulty wine very often. The fault kit is therefore essential. During the exam, it is important not to overdo the tasting of the faulty wines, and try and determine as much as possible by the color, texture, and smell.  I did not rush and gave my nose and tongue time to rest before moving on to the next glasses.  Honestly, I did not feel very confident going into this part of the exam, but I went in thinking I would give it my best shot… and I passed.

Do you have any other advice for certification seekers?

I recommend learning by doing as much as possible, whether it is labeling maps, circling multiple choice answers, writing mock questions of your own, speaking through the logical tasting rationale out loud, or writing practice essays—doing is better than simply reading or memorizing quietly.  The SWE’s CWE Boot Camp is of course another way to review exam materials, and most importantly, boost your confidence.

I also enlisted my friends as “volunteer” students and explained certain concepts to them such as “What makes wines of the Loire so special?” or “Why do some wines sparkle?” or “How do you make wines taste sweet?”  I paid them for their time with guided tastings, which they enjoyed.  Teaching the material reminded me why I wanted to take the CWE exam and kept me motivated.

Congratulations, Lucia! You give us all hope!

The Banfi Award is named in honor of, and sponsored by Banfi Vintners. Banfi Vintners is a long-running sponsor and supporter of the Society of Wine Educators.

Post authored by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE – your blog administrator

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!

Rioja Rocks on! Village-specific Wines Approved for the Rioja DOCa…

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The Rioja DOCa has taken another step in its process of modernizing its wine regulations as well as allowing for more information, particularly involving geographical indications, on the labels of its finest wines. This process came to light last June when the Consejo Regulador  de la Denominación de Origen Rioja approved wines of  Viñedos Singulares, effectively allowing the wines of the region to be labeled with the name of a specific (“singular”) vineyard.

As of August 11 (2017), another change has been confirmed with the approval of the use of specific pueblo (village) names as well. Wines produced from the grapes of a specific village will be known as Vinos de Pueblo. Vinos de Pueblo will be required to be labeled under a unique brand name to differentiate them from a producer’s standard Rioja DOCa wines. According to the Drinks Business website, the first three villages to be approved for use as Vinos de Pueblo are Samaniego, San Vicente, and Haro.

In addition, the sub-zones of the Rioja DOCa, well-known to wine students as the Rioja Alta, Rioja Alavesa, and Rioja Baja, will now be known as simply “zones” (zonas). The standards for the use of a  zone-indication on a wine label have also been loosened a bit—a minimum of 85% of the grapes are now required to be grown in the specified zone.

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In summary, the wines of the Rioja DOCa are now allowed to labeled with the following geographic  information:

  • Specific zone (Rioja Alta, Rioja Alavesa, Rioja Baja)
  • Approved single estate/vineyard (Viñedo Singular)
  • Specific village (Vinos de Pueblo)— Samaniego, San Vicente, or Haro

Click here for a nice infographic representing the hierarchy of these new categories: La Nueva Clasificacion de Vinos de Rioja

As of the August changes, Quality Sparkling Wines are now approved for production under the Rioja DOCa, with details on production requirements to follow. And…the changes are still coming, as a revision in the definition for the use of the aging terms Reserva and Gran Reserva is scheduled to come into effect in early 2019.

References/for more information:

Post authored by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE – your blog administrator

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!

News from France: Three New AOCs on the Docket!

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The Institut National de l’Origine et de la Qualité (INAO) has been busy lately, and three new AOCs for French Wine have been approved. They are: Côte d’Or AOC (Burgundy), Corrèze AOC (Southwest France/Nouvelle-Aquitaine), and Vézelay AOC (Burgundy/Yonne). All three of these new AOCs are awaiting final approval from the European Union.

Corrèze AOC: The newly-announced Corrèze AOC is located in the Corrèze Department, situated in Southwest France (Nouvelle-Aquitaine), somewhat inland (east) of Bordeaux. A portion of the Corrèze AOC was previously recognized as the Vins de la Corrèze IGP. The Corrèze AOC is approved for red wines based on Cabernet Franc with the possible addition of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Other approved wines include a sweet, dried-grape “straw wine” produced from the allowed varieties of Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay, and/or Sauvignon Blanc. Wines approved for production under the subzone “Corrèze-Coteaux de la Vézère” include dry reds produced from 100% Cabernet Franc and dry whites produced from 100% Chenin Blanc. There are currently 185 acres (75 ha) divided among 45 growers planted to vines in the Corrèze AOC.

Vézelay AOC: The newly-recognized Vézelay AOC is located in the southern portion of the Yonne department in Burgundy, and includes the hillsides along both sides of the Cure River (a right tributary of the Yonne River). Four communes— Asquins, Saint Père, Tharoiseau and Vézelay—are included in the region. Vézelay was previously an approved subzone of the Burgundy (Bourgogne) AOC. The Vézelay AOC is approved for dry white wines only, produced from 100% Chardonnay. There are currently 225 acres (90 ha), divided among 25 growers, planted to vines in the AOC.

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Côte D’Or AOC: The Côte D’Or AOC, finally approved by the INAO after more than twenty years of squabbling, represents a new regional appellation for Burgundy wines. The new AOC covers about 2,470 acres (1,000 ha) of area and basically combines the Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune areas of production. The Côte D’Or AOC is approved for dry red wines produced from 100% Pinot Noir and dry white wines produced from 100% Chardonnay.

In other news, the EU has approved an AOC for Ail violet de Cadours (Purple Garlic of Cadours), as well as a Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) for Charolais de Bourgogne (beef from the grass-fed Charolais cattle of Burgundy).

References/for more information:

Post authored by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE – your blog administrator

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!