Friday SWEbinar: Cold as Ice!

Vineyards at the Gray Monk Estate Winery in the Okanagan Valley

Vineyards at the Gray Monk Estate Winery in the Okanagan Valley

This Friday – March 27th, 2015 at 12 Noon central time – we will be offering a new SWEbinar: Cold as Ice  - Myths and Realities of Canadian Wine. This session will be presented by Jordan Cowe, CWE. Jordan is a a newly-minted CWE based in Niagara-on-the-Lake.

Session Synopsis: Think of a description of Canadian wine regions in your mind. Were dry deserts, big red wines, or Napa Valley heat levels even a consideration? No? Well – they should be – and it’s time to find out why! Take a journey across this not-so-frozen country and learn about the unique micro-climates that dot this extreme landscape from cool, sparkling-focused Nova Scotia to the humid, heat-drenched summers of Southern Ontario and on to the desert-like conditions in British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley!

We’ll take a look at the geography, viticultural practices and winemaking techniques used to make wines in this country of extremes. Learn about current issues facing this developing wine culture as it tries to grow and enter a world market that knows it only for Icewine.

JordanOur guest presenter, Jordan Cowe, CWE is a sommelier and wine educator in Canada’s largest wine region. Based in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Jordan teaches courses for sommeliers, wine professionals and consumers alike with the goal of instilling a more relaxed approach to wine. With a strong passion and connection to the Canadian wine industry Jordan would be happy to help address any specific topics of interests; he can be contacted at jdcowe@wineeh.ca  with any questions or suggestions.

SWE’s SWEbinar series is unique in that it is offered free-of-charge, and open to the public! We also try to accomodate all schedules by offering sessions on weekdays and weekends, as well as daytime and evening hours. If you have a topic you would like to see addressed, or a time-of-day that would work for you, please let our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles, know via email at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Login Instructions: At the appointed time, just click here. There is no need to register in advance. Link will go “live” a few hours before the scheduled date.

Spring SWEbinarWhen the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity. We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but its still a good idea to log on early!

  • If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time (just click on the link).
  • If you are having any trouble with your Adobe Connect connection, please see our SWEbinar Trouble-shooting page.

 Link: Friday, March 27th at 12 noon central time-Cold as Ice – Myths and Realities of Canadian Wine - 12 Noon central time (Link will go “live” a few hours before the scheduled date/time.) 

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Click here for the 2015 SWEbinar Calendar

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!

March 2015 SWEbinars!

March 2015 SWEbinars

Spring SWEbinarWe have some exciting things planned for our March 2015 SWEbinar program!

  • Cold as Ice – Myths and Realities of Canadian Wine, presented by Jordan Cowe, CWE. Think of a description of Canadian wine regions in your mind. Were Deserts, Big Reds or Napa Valley heat levels even a consideration? No? Well – they should be – and it’s time to find out why! Take a journey across this not-so-frozen country and learn about the unique micro climates that dot this extreme landscape from cool, sparkling-focused Nova Scotia to the humid, heat-drenched summers of Southern Ontario and on to the desert- like conditions in British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley! We’ll take a look at the geography, viticultural practices and winemaking techniques used to make wines in this country of extremes. Learn about current issues facing this developing wine culture as it tries to grow and enter a world market that knows it only for Icewine. Jordan Cowe is a sommelier and wine educator in Canada’s largest wine region. Based in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Jordan teaches courses for sommeliers, wine professionals and consumers alike with the goal of instilling a more relaxed approach to wine. With a strong passion and connection to the Canadian wine industry Jordan would be happy to help address any specific topics of interests; he can be contacted at jdcowe@wineeh.ca  with any questions or suggestions. “Cold as Ice” will be presented on Friday, March 27th at 12 noon central time.
  • We will also be offering another monthly installment of our popular “Insider’s Guide to the CSW Exam.”  If you are currently pursuing the CSW Certification, or considering the CSW as your next stage of professional development, this session is for you! This online workshop will cover all aspects of the CSW, including what the test covers, how difficult the test is, what type of questions to expect, the resources available to students, and how long SWE recommends for study before sitting the exam. The Insider’s Guide to the CSW Exam will be offered on Saturday, March 14th – 10:00 am central time.
  • In honor of the recent publication of our 2015 Certified Specialist of Spirits Study Guide, we will be offering – now once-a-month - an “Insider’s Guide to the CSS Exam.” This too will become a monthly installment. If you have questions about the CSS Exam, have just started the to study, or are still a cocktail-enthusiast who is “thinking about” getting certified, you’ll find the answers to all your questions at the “Insider’s Guide”! The Insider’s Guide to the CSS Exam will run on Wednesday, March 18th at 7:00 pm central time. 

SWEbinar streetSWE’s SWEbinar series is unique in that it is offered free-of-charge, and open to the public! We also try to accomodate all schedules by offering sessions on weekdays and weekends, as well as daytime and evening hours. If you have a topic you would like to see addressed, or a time-of-day that would work for you, please let our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles know via email at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

 

Login Instructions: At the appointed time, just click on the link. There is no need to register in advance. Links will be attached to the date and time announcement of each session in the list below and will go “live” a few hours before the scheduled date.

When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity. We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but its still a good idea to log on early!

  • If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time (just click on the link).
  • If you are having any trouble with your Adobe Connect connection, please see our SWEbinar Trouble-shooting page.

 Links: SWEbinars for March 2015

  • Saturday, March 14th – 10:00 am central time – the Insider’s Guide to the CSW (Wine) Exam (Link will go “live” a few hours before the scheduled date/time.) 
  • Wednesday, March 18th at 7:00 pm central time – the Insider’s Guide to the CSS (Spirits) Exam(Link will go “live” a few hours before the scheduled date/time.) 
  • Friday, March 27th at 12 noon central time-Cold as Ice – Myths and Realities of Canadian Wine (Link will go “live” a few hours before the scheduled date/time.) 

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Click here for the 2015 SWEbinar Calendar

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!

 

A Few of my Favorite Scarps

Devil's Tower

Devil’s Tower

To look at it, a scarp seems like the edge of the world – and, in a manner of speaking, it is. The term “scarp” technically refers to the wall of bare rock that makes up the cliff-face of an area of land that stands much higher than the land that surrounds it. For an extreme example, think of the Devil’s Tower in Wyoming. Quebec City’s Cap Diamant – those gorgeous sheer cliffs just in front of the Château Frontenac dividing the upper section of the town from the Saint Lawrence lowlands below – is a more typical example.
The uplifted area of land sitting above a scarp is known as an escarpment, although the two terms tend to be used interchangeably, except perhaps by geologists. A good way to describe an escarpment is basically as an area of the earth where the elevation changes suddenly. Escarpments are often found along the ocean shore, such as the Devil’s Slide area of California’s Highway One.

Escarpments are also found on dry land. Inland escarpments, where the ground is separated into two level land surfaces divided by a sheer cliff wall, may be formed by erosion, the action of rivers or streams, via seismic activity, or a combination of these forces. And – which makes it interesting for us – many of the world’s wine regions are built around escarpments.

Escarpments created by erosion are generally composed of different types of rock or rocks from different geologic eras.  Erosion creates the two levels of land as one of the types of rock erodes much faster than the other. One well-known example of an escarpment formed by erosion is the Niagara Escarpment.

The Niagara Escarpment

The Niagara Escarpment

The capstone of the Niagara Escarpment is a type of limestone (dolomite rock, or dolostone), while the underlying rock is a more easily erodible shale.  The Niagara escarpment is famous for the Niagara Falls, which is the part of the escarpment where the Niagara River plunges over the side. We wine lovers also appreciate the region as the home of the Niagara Escarpment AVA – located along the edge of the ridge, and home to 17  wineries.

Escarpments formed by seismic action are created when a fault displaces the ground surface so that one side is higher than the other. Examples include Africa’s Great Rift Valley and Australia’s Darling Scarp. The Darling Scarp cuts through the wine-growing regions of Western Australia and forms a distinct dividing line between the Perth Hills region, which sits atop the escarpment, and the Swan District, which resides below. The difference in climate between the two next-door neighbor regions due to the resulting change in elevation is striking. The Swan District, resting on the plains below, has a warm-to-hot Mediterranean climate.  The Perth Hills, perched above, is characterized by cooler nights, lower temperatures overall, and a harvest that typically begins 10 days to 2 weeks later than its warmer neighbor.

Other escarpments can be found along ancient river valleys, where a river, over the centuries, carved the landscape into a terrace. The Huangarua Scarp, found in New Zealand’s Martinborough wine region, is one example. The Huangarua Scarp is home to several wineries, including Craggy Range and the appropriately named Escarpment Vineyard. The highest uprise of the Huangarua Scarp, at about 150 feet higher than the surrounding area, is believed to have been formed over 250,000 years ago.

"Caprock Escarpment Garza County Texas 2010" by Leaflet - via Wikimedia Commons

“Caprock Escarpment Garza County Texas 2010″ by Leaflet – via Wikimedia Commons

The Caprock Escarpment, found in west Texas and eastern New Mexico, was formed via a combination of erosion and water. The top layer of the area is composed of caliche, a type of calcium carbonate that resists erosion. The erosion of the softer underlying stone was aided over the millennium by the action of rivers and streams. The Caprock Escarpment is an abrupt, 200-mile long ridge that divides the high plains area known as the Llano Estacado from the surrounding rolling terrain of the Great Plains below. In some places, the Caprock Escarpment rises more than 1,000 feet above the surrounding plains. The Texas High Plains AVA, covering almost 8 million acres of land, sits atop this huge plateau. The outline of the AVA follows the contour of the ridge at an elevation of 2,800 feet, and extends north and west. At its highest point, the elevation of the Texas High Plains AVA reaches 4,100 feet. The AVA currently has about 4,000 acres of vines and is home to over 75 mostly family-owned vineyards and at least 8 wineries.

Burgundy’s Côte d’Or, Sancerre in the Loire Valley, and Australia’s Murray Darling region are a few of the many other wine regions affected by scarps and escarpments. To learn more about scarps (and rías, and slopes, and benches) join us on Friday, January 23rd and Wednesday, January 28th for our SWEbinar entitled “Rías, Benches, Slopes, and Scarps – Physical Geography in the Vineyard.”

For more information please contact Jane Nickles, our Director of Education and Certification at: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

 

 

SWE Takes Minneapolis!

MinneapolisSWE will be hosting a Minneapolis Mini-Conference on Thursday, September 18th! This event will take place at the at The Westin Minneapolis, located at 88 South 6th Street, Minneapolis, MN, 55402.  Sessions will meet in the hotel’s “Manufacturing Room” and will run from 1:00pm to 4:00pm.

The sessions for this mini-con will include:

1:00pm to 2:15pm – Sexy, sensuous and seductive – Now that’s Italian!!! 

Presented by Neill Trimble, CSW – Join us on a romp through the vineyards of Italy where we taste palate titillating wines from Piedmont,  Veneto and Tuscany – among others.  We will recount some fascinating stories such as how Gavi got its name, how Romeo and Juliet had a role to play in Soave and do you know when the first vintage of Brunello was born.  We will reveal this and much, much more!

2:45pm to 4:00pm – The Secret Life of Pinot Noir

  • Presented by Jane A. Nickles, CSS, CWE
  • Pinot Noir…it’s temperamental, it ripens too early, it has thin skin and it’s just Secret life of Pinot Noirplain complicated. It’s been called the heartbreak grape, and we’ve probably all been burned.  At the same time, the  delicious, haunting flavors of a good Pinot Noir – including include cherries, berries, smoke, spice, earthiness, brambles, truffles (and that’s just the beginning) – can inhabit your memory like a permanent smile. Join “Miss Jane” Nickles,  SWE’s Director of Education, for a tasting of some excellent examples of this finicky wine and an exploration of the “secret life” of Pinot Noir.

Members can join us for an incredible day as we taste and learn about wines from around the world. To RSVP, please contact Jessica Morse:  jmorse@societyofwineeducators.org. This event is open and free to all current members of the SWE; non-members may register for a $50 fee.

Click here to return to the SWE Homepage.

 

 

Conference Preview: The History of California in Six Glasses

Today we have a guest post from Michael Wangbickler. Michael will be presenting his session, The History of California in Six Glasses, next month at SWE’s 38th Annual Conference in Seattle, Washington. Read on to hear a bit about the history of California wine!

father serraThe story of the California wine industry is replete with interesting characters, historical milestones, and wacky situations.

Indeed, the history of wine in California is tied to the history of modern California itself. It all began with the Spanish colonization of the area. During the 18th Century, Spanish missionaries led by Franciscan friar Junípero Serra Ferrer established a series of missions ranging from San Diego to Sonoma. And, of course, the one thing that is absolutely necessary for Catholic mass is nor a chapel or church, but WINE for the sacrament. It was the friar, monks, and their parishioners who first discovered that California provided ideal conditions for the making of good wine.

It wasn’t until the 19th century and immigration of other Europeans that California wine became a commercial proposition. The discovery of gold in 1848 in the Sierra Nevada Mountains brought an influx of fortune seekers from around the world. The discovery preceded the annexation of California from Mexico by only about a month, and the following year saw the population of the state explode. While a few made their fortunes, many did not. But, one fact was certainly true… they were a thirsty bunch.

It was a ready and open market for alcohol that spurred many of the early pioneers in the business to plant a few acres and start making wine for the “forty-niner” gold prospectors and others who followed in their wake.

Most of the early stuff was produced from a random assortment of grapes drawn from buena vista winerycuttings brought from back east or the “mission” grapes brought by the Spanish. That is, until a Hungarian-American traveler, writer, town-builder, and pioneer winemaker named Count Agoston Haraszthy came onto the scene. In the early 1850s, he established a small vineyard in San Francisco to satisfy local demand, but found the area ill-suited to grape production due to the foggy weather. Finding his way 50 miles north of the Golden Gate to the town of Sonoma, he bought a vineyard in 1857 and named it Buena Vista, meaning beautiful view.

But the self-named Count wasn’t satisfied with only owning a vineyard, oh no. He wanted the whole state to be a new Garden of Eden for grapes. In 1858 he penned a “Report on Grapes and Wine of California,” which was published by the California State Agricultural Society. With practical advice for planting vines and making wines, it encouraged the planting of grapes throughout the state. In later years, Haraszthy’s “Report” was recognized as the first treatise on winemaking written and published in California, and praised as the “first American explication of traditional European winemaking practices.”

napa californiaIn 1861, Haraszthy made a trip to Europe to investigate the best European vine-planting and winemaking practices and to gather cuttings of European vines. He traveled through France, Germany, Switzerland, and Spain before returning to California with more than 100,000 cuttings of more than 350 different varieties of vines. His efforts in this regard solidified California as a future wine powerhouse and set the stage for those that followed. Too bad he eventually “disappeared” in a Crocodile-infested swamp in Nicaragua. But that’s another tale.

While today we tend to think of Napa Valley as the best that California has to offer, the early pioneers settled in other areas, such as Sonoma and Livermore. In 1882, three Czech brothers named Korbel built a winery in western Sonoma County and began making sparkling wine, one of the earliest wineries to do so. A year later in 1883, Carl Wente planted 43 acres in Livermore Valley and began a legacy; Wente Vineyards is still owned and operated by the fourth and fifth generation of the Wente family. Their contributions to California wine include the Wente clone of Chardonnay, which is widely planted throughout the state and the backbone of many great wines from many producers.

Others followed and carried the industry into the 20th Century… Georges de Latour, André Tchelistcheff, Cesare, Peter, and Robert Mondavi, and Ernest and Julio Gallo are but a few of a long list of names of individuals whose vision, determination, and spunk have made California wine what it is today.

M wangbicklerThis article is but a teaser of some of the subjects we will cover in my conference session titled “The History of California in Six Glasses.” We will taste wines from some of these historic producers, explore what each signifies in their contribution to the California wine industry, and generally have a great time exploring the lives of some of the business’ most interesting characters.

Before moving to wine country a decade ago, Michael Wangbickler knew virtually nothing about wine. Undaunted, he threw himself into learning everything he could about the subject and now holds a Diploma in Wine & Spirits (DWS) from the Wine and Spirit Education Trust (WSET) and is a Certified Wine Educator (CWE). Mike currently holds a position at Balzac Communications and Marketing in Napa, California. In addition, he also sits on the Board of Directors for the Drink Local Wine organization. Michael’s session will be presented on Friday, August 15th at 3:00 pm.

 

August SWEbinars: The Insider’s Guide to the CSW Exam!

Insiders guide for blogAs part of our ongoing series of CSW-prep SWEbinars, we are offering a very special session in August titled “The Insider’s Guide to the CSW.” If you are currently pursuing the CSW Certification, or considering the CSW as your next stage of professional development, this session is for you!

This online workshop will cover all aspects of the CSW, including what the test covers, how difficult the test is, what type of questions to expect, the resources available to students, and how long SWE recommends for study before sitting the exam. This session is led by Jane A. Nickles, CSS, CWE (SWE’s Director of Education). You will have a chance to ask any and all questions about the CSW – she’ll answer just about any questions save for “what are the answers?”

distillation blogOur series of CSS-related “Spirited SWEbinars also continues August! This month we are pleased to offer a session on Spirit Production, based on chapter 1 in the CSS Study Guide and beyond.

This session, led by Gary Spadafore, CSS, CWE, is sure to be fascinating for CSS students and fans of spirits alike! Join us to learn about distiller’s beer, feints, washbacks, and reflux – and definitely join us if you are a CSS aspirant who doesn’t know those terms!

SWE’s SWEbinar series is unique in that it is offered free-of-charge, and open to the public! We also try to accomodate all schedules by offering sessions on weekdays and weekends, as well as daytime and evening hours. If you have a topic you would like to see addressed, or a time-of-day that would work for you, please let our Director of Education, Jane A. Nickles, know via email at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

SWE...we might just be the most accessible wine education on earth!

SWE…we might just be the most accessible wine education on earth!

Login Instructions: At the appointed time, just click on the link. There is no need to register in advance.  Links will be attached to the date and time announcement of each session in the list below and will go “live” a few days before the scheduled date.

When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity. We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but its still a good idea to log on early!

  • If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time (just click on the link).

August 2014:

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

Click here for the 2014 SWEbinar Calendar

 

Start the Weekend with a Saturday SWEbinar!

veniceIt’s a rare sighting of a Saturday SWEbinar!!

This Saturday – June 7, 2104 – at 10:00 am central time – we’re offering a Saturday morning SWEbinar all about the grapes and places of Italian Wine!  We’re offering this special weekend version in response to many requests for evening and weekend SWEbinars, and while we’re not sure what kind of a turn out we’ll receive, we are giving it a go! These SWEbinars are free and open to the public!

This session, called “The Italian Grape Game” will be led by our Director of Education, “Miss Jane” Nickles.  Jane’s session will be a lively way for you to test your knowledge of Italy’s wines and wine regions. You are advised to read and study chapter 10 of the CSW Study Guide in advance – this is glass-to-glass competition!

And don’t forget to ask about “Vice President Lenny,” who you’ll be meeting at the session. Vice President Lenny is here to help you learn the Italian wine regions – trust us on this one!

Login instructions and a link to the online classroom are located below.  If you’d like to be sent a reminder about the session on Saturday morning, or have any other questions about our SWEbinar series, please contact jane at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org.

See you Saturday!

Great way to start the weekend!

Great way to start the weekend!

Login Instructions:  At the appointed time, just click on the link.  (Links will be attached to the date and time announcement of each session in the list below and will go “live” a few days before the scheduled date.) When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.”  Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity.  We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but it is still a good idea to log on early!

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time.

To join the session, just click on the link: Saturday, June 7 – 1o:oo am Central Time – The Italian Grape Game, based on Chapter 10 in the CSW Study Guide, hosted by Jane A. Nickles, CSS, CWE

Click here to see the SWEbinar schedule for the rest of 2014!

The Gin is In

Fig 4-10 A Classic Gin and TonicLive, tomorrow (Wednesday, June 4, 2014) at noon central time…SWE is happy to present a SWEbinar all about Gin!

The session is perfect for cocktail lovers, spirits enthusiasts, and most of all…CSS Candidates. If you want to be “up” on Gin before we begin, be sure and read Chapter 3 in your CSS Study Guide before hand.

We’ll be talking about how gin is made, some of the crazy, obscure botanicals that go into its production, the various types of gin, and some of the classic cocktails in which gin has a starring role! This session will be led by Hoke Harden, CSS, CWE. Hoke is a wealth of knowledge and an experienced spiritis educator – we are in for a treat!

So pour yourself and Gin and Tonic, a dry Martini, or a refreshing Gin Rickey, and let’s talk gin!

Login instructions and a link to the Gin Classroom are found below.  If you have any further questions about our Gin SWEbinar (or any of our other SWEbinars), please contact Jane Nickles at: jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org.

Fig 11-7 Tom CollinsLogin Instructions:  At the appointed time, just click on the link.  (Links will be attached to the date and time announcement of each session in the list below and will go “live” a few days before the scheduled date.) When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.” 

Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity.  We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but it is still a good idea to log on early!

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time.

Link to the Classroom: Wednesday, June 4 – 12 Noon Central Time – The Gin is In – SWEbinar on Gin – CSS Chapter 4  

Click here to view our 2014 SWEbinar Schedule.

 

June 2014 SWEbinars!

Swebinar in the grassJune 2014 SWEbinars

Our series of CSS and CSW review SWEbinars continues in June! These sessions are free and open to the public!

This month we are pleased to host a session on Gin (chapter 3 in the CSS Study Guide). This is sure to be a fascinating session for CSS students and cocktail fans alike! Gin is a traditional spirit with a ribald history, and as such it is enjoying renewed popularity in today’s “craft cocktail” scene. The Gin session will be held on Wednesday, June 4th at 12 Noon central time.

For CSW students, Jane Nickles CSS, CWE, will be hosting two sessions all about the wines of Italy (chapter 10 in the CSW Study Guide). Jane’s sessions are entitled “The Italian Grape Game” and will be a lively way for you to test your knowledge of Italy’s wines and wine regions. You are advised to read and study chapter 10 of the CSW Study Guide in advance – this is glass-to-glass competition! These sessions will be held on Saturday, June 7th at 10 am central time and Friday, June 20th at noon central time.

Below you will find the details on these sessions, as well as the links to each of the sessions.

Login Instructions:  At the appointed time, just click on the link.  (Links will be attached to the date and time announcement of each session in the list below and will go “live” a few days before the scheduled date.) When the SWE Adobe Connect homepage appears, click on “enter as a guest,” type in your name, and click “enter room.”  Remember that each session is limited to 100 attendees, and that several of our past sessions have reached capacity.  We are hoping to avoid this issue in the future by offering more SWEbinars, but it is still a good idea to log on early!

SWebinar in the gardenIf you have never attended an Adobe Connect event before, it is also a good idea to test your connection ahead of time.

June 2014:

Click here for the 2014 SWEbinar Calendar

If you have any questions, please contact Jane Nickles:  jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

 

Conference Preview: On the Wine Routes of Europe with Thomas Jefferson

Today we have a guest post from Linda Lawry, CWE, DWS. Linda is always one of the most popular speakers at our SWE Conferences. In this postLinda tells us a bit about her upcoming conference session entitled “On the Wine Routes of Europe with Thomas Jefferson.”

TJWine from long habit has become indispensable to my health.”           - Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States, was a multi-faceted genius whose numerous areas of expertise ranged from architecture to zoology.  His passion for wine, while largely  neglected by historians, is one of the most fascinating aspects of his persona.

Jefferson’s journals and correspondence contain many references to wine, including detailed critiques of the wines he tasted.  He may, in fact, have been American’s first wine critic.

In 1787, while he was living in France as a representative the Untied States government, Jefferson took a three-month tour of many of the wine regions of France, Italy, and Germany.  He traveled incognito, so that he could learn what life was really like in these regions, and so that he would not have to spend his time in formal dinners with the aristocracy. He sought out vine growers and winemakers as well as the “common man and woman” living in the various wine regions.

Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's Virginia Plantation

Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia Plantation

Lucky for us modern-day wine lovers, Jefferson kept an extensive diary of his adventures in the wine regions of Europe, charting his travels as well as his opinions on quality and character of the inns, the food, the architecture, and of course, the wines he tasted. His diaries are a fascinating insight into the wine world of the 18th century, and of the character and persona of this complex and charming man.

At the 2014 SWE conference in Seattle this August, I will give a program on Jefferson’s European wine adventure. We will taste wines from the regions he visited, including some of the very same wines he tasted back then, which (lucky for us), are still being produced today.

Linda Lawry, CWE, DWS, is the Director of the International Wine Center in New York City. She is also on the faculty of New York University, where she has been teaching the Wine and Spirits Studies course in the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies since 1997. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Society of Wine Educators, a member of Les Dames d’Escoffier, and program co-chair of the Culinary Historians of New York. Linda graduated with honors from the New York Restaurant School, holds the WSET Diploma, and is a Certified Wine Educator.

Linda’s session, “On the Wine Routes of Europe with Thomas Jefferson,” will be held on Thursday, August 14, at 1:15 pm as part of the 38th Annual Conference of the Society of Wine Educators.

Click here to return to the SWE Main Website.