The 2018 CSW Study Guide and Workbook are here!

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What do all of these items have in common: The Petaluma Gap AVA…the Delle Venezie DOC…the Vézelay AOC…and the “New” New Zealand geographical indications? Answer: they are newly-changed or updated topics in the world of wine—launched in 2017! You’ll find all of these updates (and more) in the just-launched, 2018 version of the Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW) Study Guide and Workbook.

We’ve also made a change in how the books are distributed, and the 2018 CSW Study Guide and Workbook are now in stock and shipping from Amazon.com. 

Click here to find the 2018 CSW Study Guide on Amazon. The cost is $49.

Click here to find the CSW Workbook 2018 on Amazon. The cost is $39.

CSW Exam Availability: CSW Exams based on the 2018 edition of the Study Guide will be available at Pearson Vue Testing Centers starting on February 1, 2018. Exams based on the 2017 book are also still available (for those that have a 2017 exam attendance credit) and will continue to be available until July of 2020.

Online Prep Course: Our next instructor-led CSW Online Prep Course is scheduled to begin in May 2018. For this class, students may use either the 2017 or the 2018 version of the CSW Study Guide and Workbook. The aim of the prep course is to get attendees “as prepared as humanly possible” for a successful sitting of the CSW Exam. Online prep courses are available, free-of-charge, to Professional members of SWE who have a valid CSW Exam attendance credit.

The CSW Exam may be purchased via the SWE website: Click here to purchase the CSW Exam.

Click here for an addendum listing the substantive changes between the 2017 and 2018 versions of the CSW Study Guide: Addendum for the CSW 2018 Study Guide

Flashcards and Practice Quizzes: Our popular flashcard and practice quizzes have also been updated for 2018 (and the 2017 versions remain available). The cost for these products is $19 each. Click here for the flashcards and practice quizzes.

If you have any questions regarding the CSW Study Guides or Exams, please contact our Director of Education at jnickles@societyofwineeducators.org

 

Asti: Simple, Fruity, Delicious (and yet so Complicated)

http://www.astidocg.it/en/prodotto-gallery/

http://www.astidocg.it/en/prodotto-gallery/

Every wine lover—whether we admit it or not—has enjoyed a glass of Asti Spumante (which the wine cognoscenti will refer to simply as “Asti”) or Moscato d’Asti with lunch, brunch, or on New Year’s Eve.

It is predictable and quite correct—in most cases—to dismiss these sweet wines as “easy to love,” “great for beginners,” or “just a simple little quaff.” However, if we dig into the disciplinare of the Asti DOCG, we see that a range of wines are allowed to be produced under the designation—including wines from three sub-zones, late harvest wines, and bottle-fermented wines—all of which have probably never been referred to as “simple.” Add to these complications the fact that the rules of the DOCG were recently changed to allow the production of dry wines under the Asti DOCG—and we’ll see that perhaps we need to change our minds about Asti.

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For starters in breaking down the wines of Asti, we can determine that all of the wines produced under the Asti DOCG (located in Piedmont, Italy) are sparkling or slightly so, and are, in all cases, produced using 100% Moscato Bianco (more commonly known [outside of Italy] as Muscat blanc à Petits Grains). That’s pretty must where the similarities end. The differences are discussed below, after a short discussion on sweetness.

How Sweet it is: There is no simple statement of required levels of sweetness for the various versions of Asti. The appellation’s disciplinare does, however, state a required level of alcolometrico volumico potenziale—potential alcohol volume (the abv that would be achieved if all of the fermentable sugar was allowed to convert to alcohol)—in other words, a required ripeness at harvest for each style of wine. In addition, there is a required level of alcolometrico volumico effettivo—the actual alcohol by volume stated for each wine. By doing a bit of math, we can determine the difference between each wine’s required potential alcohol and required actual alcohol —which (using more math) will reveal the approximate amount of sugar allowed or required to be in the finished wine. For the purposes of this discussion, we’ll use the following formula: Brix X 0.55 = Potential Alcohol (or, Potential Alcohol/.55 = Brix).  Note: This calculation is at best a generality, but it is a good-enough starting point for a discussion on the character of these wines.

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Asti DOCG: Asti DOCG is sometimes referred to as Asti Spumante; both terms are acceptable for use under the DOCG. Asti/Asti Spumante DOCG is produced via second fermentation in pressurized tanks (autoclaves) using the production method commonly referred to as the Charmat Method—known in Piedmont as the Metodo Marinotti.  By EU definition, spumante means “sparkling” and as such, the minimum pressure of the dissolved bubbles of Asti is 3 atm. For these wines, the required minimum potential alcohol is 11.5%. Until recently, the required actual abv was 6.0% to 9.5%; a bit of math tells us that the (previsouly) required minimum residual sugar was around 3.6% (making these wines demi-sec or dolce [semi-sweet to sweet]). However…

New! Asti Secco: In August of 2017, the regulations were revised, and the maximum required actual alcohol (formerly 9.5%) was deleted. This means that Asti DOCG may now be produced in a dry style.  The only change in the actual rules appears to be the deletion of the 9.5% maximum actual abv requirement, but the Asti DOCG Consortium is encouraging the use of the term “secco” for wines with a 11% minimum abv (actual), and the use of the term “dolce” for the traditional, sweet wines. (The revision in the disciplinare only applies to Asti/Asti Spumante DOCG and does not affect the wines described below.)

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Asti Metodo Classico DOCG: These wines, which may also be referred to as Asti Spumante Metodo Classico DOCG, are required to be produced using the Traditional (bottle-fermented) Method of sparkling wine production and must be aged on the lees for a minimum of nine months. The required minimum sweetness (based on a required potential minimum alcohol of 12% and a required actual alcohol of 6% to 8%) is approximately 7% residual sugar and are therefore all of these wines are sweet (dolce).

Moscato d’Asti DOCG: This is the beloved, sweet sipper that has recently become so popular (although experienced wine lovers see this as a prime example of “everything old is new again” popularity). Moscato d’Asti is made using the “partial fermentation” method of sparkling wine production (also—somewhat obviously—also known as the “Asti method”). This means these wines are made by one pressurized fermentation (only) that is interrupted while there is just a bit of bubble (a maximum of 2 atm) built up in addition to a good deal of sweetness still left in the wine.  The numbers of 11% minimum potential alcohol and 4.5% to 6.5% acquired alcohol means that these wines are always sweet with at least 8% residual sugar (to use generalized terms).

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Moscato d’Asti Vendemmia Tardiva DOCG: This late-harvest version of Moscato d’Asti requires a minimum potential alcohol of 14% and a acquired alcohol of 11%, meaning these wines will have at least (approximately) 5% residual sugar. This wine is not allowed to be chaptalized and must be aged for at least one year from the date of harvest.

Sub-regions: As for the sub-regions of the Asti DOCG, they are only approved for a few of the wines and (of course) they have a few of their own requirements:

  • Canelli: This sub-zone (located in the center section of the DOCG) is only approved for Moscato d’Asti, and the wines using this designation must have a potential alcohol of 12% abv (slightly higher than the general requirement of 11%).
  • Santa Vittoira d’Alba: This sub-zone (located to the west of the central DOCG zone) is approved for Moscato d’Asti and Moscato d’Asti Vendemmia Tardiva.  Moscato d’Asti Santa Vittoira d’Alba must have a potential alcohol of 12%. The vendemmia tardiva wines have quite a few unique requirements, including: a potential alcohol content of 15% and an actual minimum of 12% abv, a minimum aging of two years (beginning with January 1 of the year after the vintage year), and partial-drying of the grapes (post-harvest).
  • Strevi: Like the Canelli sub-zone, Strevi (located on the eastern edge of the DOCG) is approved for Moscato d’Asti only, and the wines using this designation must have a potential alcohol of 12% abv (slightly higher than the general requirement of 11%).

Asti….like we said, so fun, fruity, simple, and (sometimes) sweet….and yet again, so complex.

References/for more information:

 

 

 

Austria: Serious about Sekt

http://www.austrianwine.com/our-wine/austrian-sekt/

http://www.austrianwine.com/our-wine/austrian-sekt/

As serious students of wine might remember, Austria updated it wine laws—in quite a major overhaul—in July of 2016. As part of this mashup, the laws concerning PDO Austrian Sekt were revised, and as of this the 2017 harvest, these laws have been refined and come into effect. As such, it seems like a good time to take a deep dive into the new laws concerning bubbles from Austria!

The Basics: These regulations apply to “Austrian Sekt with Protected Designation of Origin” (Österreichischer Sekt mit geschützter Ursprungsbezeichnung [gU]). Such wines must be designated on the labeled as Qualitätsschaumwein or Sekt and one of the following terms: Klassik, Reserve, or Grosse Reserve (Grand Reserve). These wines must be produced using just the 36 grape varieties designated for use in Austrian Quality wines, although specific grapes or blends are not mandated. The carbon dioxide dissolved in the bottle must be a minimum of 3.5 atm.  (Click here for a list of the: The Austria 36-Grape Varieties)

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Austrian Sekt Klassik:

  • May be produced using any sparkling wine production method
  • Grapes must be sourced from one single Austrian State, which must serve as the wine’s appellation of origin
  • Must be vinified in Austria
  • Minimum 12.5% abv
  • Minimum of 9 months aging on the lees; may be released to the consumer after October 22 of the year following harvest
  • All styles (red, white, rosé) and all sweetness levels are allowed

Austrian Sekt Reserve:

  • Must be made using the traditional method of sparkling wine production with whole-cluster pressing
  • Grapes must be sourced from one single Austrian State, which must serve as the wine’s appellation of origin
  • Must be hand-harvested
  • (No regulations regarding abv)
  • Minimum of 18 months aging on the lees; may be released to the consumer after October 22 of the second year following harvest
  • Must be brut-level sweetness or drier
  • May be red, white, or rosé, but rosé must be produced using red grapes only
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Austrian Sekt Grosse Reserve (Grand Reserve):

  • Must be made using the traditional method of sparkling wine production with whole-cluster pressing
  • Grapes must be sourced from one single Austrian winegrowing community, vineyard designation from registered sites permitted
  • Must be hand-harvested
  • (No regulations regarding abv)
  • Minimum of 30 months aging on the lees; may be released to the consumer after October 22 of the third year following harvest
  • Must be brut-level sweetness or drier (maximum 12 g/L R.S.)
  • May be red, white, or rosé, but rosé must be produced using red grapes only

For many of us, it seems like these regulations come just in time for the winter holidays, giving us one more reason to reach for the bubbly!

References/for more information:

Welcome to the World, Petaluma Gap AVA!

Map via: http://petalumagap.com

Map via: http://petalumagap.com

Welcome to the World, Petaluma Gap AVA!

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) of the United States has—just today—approved the first new American Viticultural Area (AVA) in over a year, and it is…the Petaluma Gap AVA!

Along with the approval of the new AVA—located in California’s Sonoma and Marin Counties—the southern boundary of the North Coast AVA is being expanded to include the northern portions of Marin County. The Petaluma Gap AVA overlaps a portion of the Sonoma Coast AVA and will be considered a sub-appellation of the newly re-outlined North Coast AVA.

The petition for the Petaluma Gap AVA was submitted by the Petaluma Gap Winegrowers Alliance in February of 2015. According to the petition, the unique factors of the area include the following:

  • The Petaluma Gap itself: A geological feature known as a “wind gap,” the Petaluma gap is actually a 15-mile-wide area of low-lying hills that create something of an opening in the otherwise much taller Coast Mountains. This area stretches from the Pacific Ocean, eastward to the bucolic Sonoma town of Petaluma, and then straight on through to San Pablo Bay. The effect on the area is as follows: as the inland areas heat up during the day, the heat causes the warm air to rise, and the cool air off the Pacific Ocean is pulled up into the gap. The wind gains speed as it travels, and eventually empties into the bay.
  • The Wind: Late afternoon wind speed within the Petaluma Gap is typically 8 miles per hour, and it is often clocked in at over 20 mph. In contrast, winds in the surrounding areas rarely get above 2 or 3 miles per hour.
  • The Climate: Mornings are cool and typically foggy. Late mornings and early afternoons are increasingly warm after the fog burns off. However, the breezes typically begin by mid-afternoon, cooling things down and bringing in the evening fog. The diurnal temperature range can be forty to fifty degrees (F).
  • The Grapes: The almost-daily winds tend to help reduce yield in the vines, creating late-ripening, small-berried fruit with intense flavors and good acidity.
Map via: http://petalumagap.com

Map via: http://petalumagap.com

An announcement regarding the establishment of the Petaluma Gap AVA was published in the Federal Register on December, 7, 2017; this final rule will be effective on January 8, 2018. The area within the new AVA totals 202,476 acres. There are currently over 80 winegrowers, 4,000 acres of vines, and 9 wineries located within the boundaries of the new region. The area is planted mainly to Pinot Noir along with Chardonnay and Syrah. Click here for a list of wineries located within the region, as well as those that produce wine using Petaluma Gap fruit.

We look forward to tasting these wines—and welcome to the world, Petaluma Gap AVA!

Note: Before today, the last AVA to be approved in the United States was the Appalachian High Country AVA (encompassing parts of North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee) in October of 2016. With the change in the Executive Branch that occurred earlier this year, several key posts at the Department of the Treasury were left vacant, including several whose signatures are required for new AVA rulings. However, in recent weeks these positions have been filled (including Brent James McIntosh, General Counsel and David Kautte, Assistant Secretary for Tax Policy). It seems that the business of approving AVAs is back on!

References/for more information:

Belgium and the Netherlands have a PDO Wine: the Maasvallei Limburg PDO

Map via: http://wijngoed-thorn.nl/nl/3/nieuws

Map via: http://wijngoed-thorn.nl/nl/3/nieuws

The Maas River (known in France as the Meuse) runs for over 575 miles (925 km) from its source in France’s Grand Est Region. From there, it flows north through Belgium, then forms a portion of the border between Belgium and the Netherlands before turning slightly to the east and wandering a bit before joining the Hollands Diep and flowing into the North Sea.

A portion of the area where the Maas forms the border between Belgium and the Netherlands (about 60 square miles) is known as the Maasvallei Limburg. Maasvallei Limburg has (believe it or not) recently been designated as a PDO wine region by the European Union. This is noteworthy for several reasons, including the area’s northerly location (between 50° and 51ºN) and the fact that this will be the first PDO wine region that crosses the border and includes area within two separate EU countries.

According to the EU petition, “Grapes for wine were cultivated in the abbeys along the Maas in the early Middle Ages. Historical texts refer to modest wine production within the abbey walls. A number of place names also refer to vineyards—including “Wingerd” (vine)—which indicate a history of wine cultivation in the area. Wine was one of the reasons that the convent of noble Benedictine nuns in Thorn acquired its status as an abbey-principality.”

In modern times, winemaking is fairly new to the area, and still somewhat obscure with just 10 producers on the Belgian side of the area (including Wijnomein Aldeneyck) and only one on the Dutch side (Wijngoed Thorn).

The Sint Servaasbrug Bridge over the River Maas (Maastricht, the Netherlands)

The Sint Servaasbrug Bridge over the River Maas (Maastricht, the Netherlands)

The Maasvallei Limburg PDO is approved for varietally-labeled red and white wines—however, according to the EU documentation, “blending is allowed, but something of an exception.”  Grapes approved for the region include the following:

  • Red Grapes: Acolon (a Blauer Lemberger  X Dornfelder cross), Dornfelder, and Pinot Noir
  • White Grapes: Auxerrois, Chardonnay, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Riesling, and Siegerrebe (a Madeleine Angevine X Gewürztraminer cross)

Welcome to the world, Maasvallei Limburg PDO!

References/for more information:

 

The “New” New Zealand

Queenstown, Otago

Queenstown, Otago

If you’ve been following the wine news (or even some of our posts here at Wine, Wit, and Wisdom), you know that New Zealand is in the process of formalizing its geographical indications for wine and spirits. It is a long and interesting tale, but here is the gist:

New Zealand’s Geographical Indications (Wine and Spirits) Registration Act of 2006 created a registration system for wine and spirit geographical indications and allowed for the scheme of regions and subregions currently in use; however, the act was never brought into force. Fast forward ten years to November of 2016, and a revised law, the Geographical Indications (Wine and Spirits) Registration Amendment Act, was passed. As a result, the 2006 Act entered into force in July of 2017. Soon thereafter, applications for geographical indications began to be filed with the New Zealand Intellectual Property Office.

Mount Maunganui (suburb of Tauranga, Bay of Plenty)

Mount Maunganui (suburb of Tauranga, Bay of Plenty)

Three geographical indications—New Zealand, South Island, and North Island—were immediately approved as “enduring indications.” Several other applications for wine regions (geographical indications) and subregions (known as “local geographical indications”) have been submitted—many of these have been accepted and should become “official” in a few months—and some are still pending. Geographical indications (excluding enduring indications) will need to be renewed after the first five years, and every ten years thereafter.

One of the newly-accepted applications for geographical indications is Marlborough. Here’s an update on the area:

Accounting for over 59,000 acres (24,100 ha), the Marlborough region on the South Island is home to over two-thirds of all of New Zealand’s vines and grape production. The region is heavily planted to Sauvignon Blanc (47,000 acres/19,000 ha) and in many ways has shaped the explosive growth in New Zealand wine overall. Marlborough is also the largest producer of Pinot Noir in the country, with much of the region’s 6,400 acres (2,600 ha) of Pinot Noir is made into sparkling wine. Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Riesling, Gewürztraminer, and Viognier are grown here as well.

Blenheim, Marlborough

Blenheim, Marlborough

Cloudy Bay, which gave its name to a now-famous Sauvignon Blanc producer, and Clifford Bay are both situated along the coast of Marlborough.  The Marlborough Region can be considered to have three separate areas (unofficial subregions), from the Wairau Valley in the north, to the Awatere Valley further south, and the Southern Valleys on the inland side.

  • Wairau Valley: The Wairau Valley (known by the Maori as Kei puta te Wairau—the place with the hole in the cloud) is one of New Zealand’s sunniest places. The region is known for stony, alluvial soils and a cool climate that tends to become drier as one heads inland.
  • Awatere Valley: The Awatere Valley is located to the south of the Wairau Valley, stretching inland from the coast into the Kaikoura Ranges. This is one of the coolest, driest, and windiest areas of Marlborough—and many of the vineyards have some elevation.
  • The Southern Valleys: Located inland, the vineyards of the Southern Valleys—consisting of the Omaka, Fairhall, Brancott, Ben Morvan and Waihopai Valleys—wind and wrap around the surrounding hills. The area has a great diversity in terms of mesoclimates and soils, but does tend to heavier, more clay-based soils than the areas closer to the coast.
Auckland

Auckland

Other geographical indications of the “New” New Zealand that have been accepted (as of November 15, 2017) include Hawke’s Bay, Gisborne, Matakana (a subregion of Auckland), Waiheke Island (also a subregion of Auckland), Northland, Wairarapa, and Canterbury. More are sure to come, and we’ll be posting them as they are announced here.

References/for more information:

  • https://www.iponz.govt.nz/about-ip/geographical-indications/register/
  • https://www.nzwine.com/en
  • https://www.nzwine.com/en/our-regions/marlborough/

Post authored by Jane A. Nickles, your blog administrator

Rebirth in Austria: The Schilcherland DAC!

Map via: http://www.austrianwine.com/news-media

Map via: http://www.austrianwine.com/news-media

The Austrian wine region formerly known as Weststeiermark has been re-born as the Schilcherland DAC. This brings the total number of Districtus Austriae Controllatus regions (DACs) in Austria to ten. This change was announced via the website of the Austrian Wine Marketing Board today (October 16, 2017), and the changes will be reflected in the wines of the current vintage (2017) and moving forward.

The new DAC is approved for one type of wine only—rosé produced from 100% Blauer Wildbacher grapes. The grapes must be harvested by hand and the wine must be packaged in a glass bottle. There are two quality levels: Schilcherland “Klassik” DAC and Schilcherland DAC—which must specify a single vineyard (Ried) designation on the front label. Other requirements are noted below.

For Schilcherland Klassik DAC:

  • The wine must be vinified dry (max. 3.0 g/l residual sugar)
  • The wine should show no oak influence
  • Alcohol content must range from a minimum of 11% to a maximum of 12% abv
  • The flavor must be refreshing and fruit-forward, and should show aromas of strawberry, red currant and raspberry

Schilcherland DAC:

  • The wine must be labeled with a specific vineyard (Ried) designation
  • Minimum alcohol content of 12% abv
  • The wine must be vinified dry (max. 4.0 g/l residual sugar)
  • The wine should also be refreshing and fruit-forward and with no oak influence; but it is expected to have a deal more flavor intensity then the Klassik versions.

We’ll post more information as it becomes available, but for now—Welcome to the world, Schilcherland DAC!

References/for more information:

Rioja Rocks on! Village-specific Wines Approved for the Rioja DOCa…

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The Rioja DOCa has taken another step in its process of modernizing its wine regulations as well as allowing for more information, particularly involving geographical indications, on the labels of its finest wines. This process came to light last June when the Consejo Regulador  de la Denominación de Origen Rioja approved wines of  Viñedos Singulares, effectively allowing the wines of the region to be labeled with the name of a specific (“singular”) vineyard.

As of August 11 (2017), another change has been confirmed with the approval of the use of specific pueblo (village) names as well. Wines produced from the grapes of a specific village will be known as Vinos de Pueblo. Vinos de Pueblo will be required to be labeled under a unique brand name to differentiate them from a producer’s standard Rioja DOCa wines. According to the Drinks Business website, the first three villages to be approved for use as Vinos de Pueblo are Samaniego, San Vicente, and Haro.

In addition, the sub-zones of the Rioja DOCa, well-known to wine students as the Rioja Alta, Rioja Alavesa, and Rioja Baja, will now be known as simply “zones” (zonas). The standards for the use of a  zone-indication on a wine label have also been loosened a bit—a minimum of 85% of the grapes are now required to be grown in the specified zone.

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In summary, the wines of the Rioja DOCa are now allowed to labeled with the following geographic  information:

  • Specific zone (Rioja Alta, Rioja Alavesa, Rioja Baja)
  • Approved single estate/vineyard (Viñedo Singular)
  • Specific village (Vinos de Pueblo)— Samaniego, San Vicente, or Haro

Click here for a nice infographic representing the hierarchy of these new categories: La Nueva Clasificacion de Vinos de Rioja

As of the August changes, Quality Sparkling Wines are now approved for production under the Rioja DOCa, with details on production requirements to follow. And…the changes are still coming, as a revision in the definition for the use of the aging terms Reserva and Gran Reserva is scheduled to come into effect in early 2019.

References/for more information:

Post authored by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE – your blog administrator

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!

News from France: Three New AOCs on the Docket!

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The Institut National de l’Origine et de la Qualité (INAO) has been busy lately, and three new AOCs for French Wine have been approved. They are: Bourgogne-Côte d’Or AOC (Burgundy), Corrèze AOC (Southwest France/Nouvelle-Aquitaine), and Vézelay AOC (Burgundy/Yonne). All three of these new AOCs are awaiting final approval from the European Union.

Corrèze AOC: The newly-announced Corrèze AOC is located in the Corrèze Department, situated in Southwest France (Nouvelle-Aquitaine), somewhat inland (east) of Bordeaux. A portion of the Corrèze AOC was previously recognized as the Vins de la Corrèze IGP. The Corrèze AOC is approved for red wines based on Cabernet Franc with the possible addition of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Other approved wines include a sweet, dried-grape “straw wine” produced from the allowed varieties of Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay, and/or Sauvignon Blanc. Wines approved for production under the subzone “Corrèze-Coteaux de la Vézère” include dry reds produced from 100% Cabernet Franc and dry whites produced from 100% Chenin Blanc. There are currently 185 acres (75 ha) divided among 45 growers planted to vines in the Corrèze AOC.

Vézelay AOC: The newly-recognized Vézelay AOC is located in the southern portion of the Yonne department in Burgundy, and includes the hillsides along both sides of the Cure River (a right tributary of the Yonne River). Four communes— Asquins, Saint Père, Tharoiseau and Vézelay—are included in the region. Vézelay was previously an approved subzone of the Burgundy (Bourgogne) AOC. The Vézelay AOC is approved for dry white wines only, produced from 100% Chardonnay. There are currently 225 acres (90 ha), divided among 25 growers, planted to vines in the AOC.

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Bourgogne-Côte d’Or AOC: The Côte d’Or AOC, finally approved by the INAO after more than twenty years of squabbling, represents a new sub-appellation of the Bourgogne AOC. The newly-designated area covers about 2,470 acres (1,000 ha) of area and basically combines the Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune areas of production. The Bourgogne-Côte d’Or AOC is approved for dry red wines produced from 100% Pinot Noir and dry white wines produced from 100% Chardonnay.

In other news, the EU has approved an AOC for Ail violet de Cadours (Purple Garlic of Cadours), as well as a Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) for Charolais de Bourgogne (beef from the grass-fed Charolais cattle of Burgundy).

References/for more information:

Post authored by Jane A. Nickles, CSE, CWE – your blog administrator

Are you interested in being a guest blogger or a guest SWEbinar presenter for SWE?  Click here for more information!

In Memoriam of SWE Member Michael Bryan (1966-2017)

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Michael James Bryan, founder and managing partner of the Atlanta Wine School and wine emporium Vino Venue, left this life on July 9, 2017 surrounded by his family following a long battle with cancer.

A Certified Sommelier and longtime member of the Society of Wine Educators, Michael was an eloquent speaker, superb instructor, and mentor to many. His inspiration and enthusiasm helped thousands of people to evolve as oenophiles.  He founded the Atlanta Wine School in 2003 and brought Vino Venue into being in 2012.  Vino Venue embodied Michael’s talent, knowledge and passion in the wine and culinary world as an Atlanta destination for dining, wine tasting, and private events.

Michael was a 1989 graduate of the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business and a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.  He held certifications from many internationally-recognized organizations, including: Certified Specialist of Wine from The Society of Wine Educators; Certified Sommelier from the Court of Master Sommeliers, Advanced Certificate (with Merit) from the Wine & Spirit Education Trust of London, Spanish Wine Educator from the Spanish Wine Academy, and International Bordeaux Wine Educator from L’Ecole du Vin in Bordeaux.

Michael’s love for wine education ran deep, and he was passionate about sharing his knowledge with others. You could sense it when he led a wine class, when he talked a customer through the wines in Vino Venue’s Enomatic machines, or when he took a group through wine regions such as Bordeaux, Oregon, or Tuscany.

Michael was also passionate about music, travel and life in general. He was a genuine, generous, ambitious and loving soul. He lit the room up with his presence.  He was optimistic and courageous in the face of cancer until the very end. His perseverance and positive attitude were inspiring.

Michael was born in Oklahoma City in 1966, son of Dorothy Hall Bryan and Larry James Bryan. He is survived by his parents and his wife Lelia Lee Bryan; daughters Willa Napier Bryan, Mackenzie Hidell Bryan and Berkley Kelleher Bryan; brother Dustin Lee Bryan; and step-mother Diana Marie Bryan.

Michael’s life will be celebrated according to his wishes with a party in Atlanta for his friends and family on Sunday, August 13.  In lieu of flowers, please consider donations to the Sarcoma Foundation of America at curesarcoma.org or to The Willa Bryan Education Trust, care of Mason Bahr LLP, 155Technology Pkwy #400, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092.